Breed Standards

 

 

CANADIAN  BREED STANDARD FOR THE SAMOYED

Revised Standard CKC approved September 1992,         
Effective January 1, 1993

ORIGIN AND PURPOSE: One of the oldest domesticated breeds of dogs, the Samoyed was bred and developed by the nomadic Samoyede tribes in Northeast Siberia north of the Arctic Circle. Rather than being bred for a specific purpose, they were bred and are noted for their versatility as a sled, herding, guard and companion dog. They made a tremendous contribution to the Arctic and Antarctic expeditions as a strong and dependable sled dog. They were used by the Samoyede people as a sled and draught animal as well as to guard and drive reindeer herds from one feeding ground to another. Their importance to the Samoyede people, who depend largely upon their dogs for survival, caused them to be regarded as members of the family and companions, as well as tough, sturdy work animals, which contributed to the unique Samoyed disposition of today.

GENERAL APPEARANCE: The Samoyed, being essentially a working dog, should present a picture of beauty, alertness and strength, with agility, dignity and grace. As their work lies in the cold climate, their coat should be heavy and weather resistant, and of good quality rather than quantity. The male carries more of a "ruff" than the
female. they should not be long in the back as a weak back would make them practically useless for their legitimate work, but at the same time a close-coupled body would also place them at a great disadvantage as a draught dog. Breeders should aim for the happy medium, a body not long but muscular, allowing liberty, with a deep chest and well-sprung ribs, strong arched neck, allowing liberty, with a deep chest and well-sprung ribs, strong arched neck, straight front and especially strong loins. Males should be masculine in appearance and deportment without unwarranted aggressiveness; bitches feminine without weakness of structure or apparent softness of temperament. Bitches may be slightly longer in back than males. They should both give the appearance of being capable of great endurance but be free from coarseness. Because of the depth of chest required, the legs should be moderately long. Hindquarters should be particularly well developed, stifles well bent and any suggestion of unsound stifles or cowhocks severely penalized. General appearance should include movement and general conformation indicating balance and good substance.

TEMPERAMENT: Intelligent, gentle, loyal, adaptable, alert, full of action, eager to serve, friendly but conservative, not distrustful or shy. Unprovoked aggressiveness is to be severely penalized.

SIZE:
a) Height - Dogs - 53 to 60 cm (21 to 23 1/2 inches) at the withers. Bitches - 48 to 55 cm
(19 to 21 1/2 inches) at the withers. An oversized or undersized Samoyed is to be penalized according to the extent of the deviation.  
b) Weight - in proportion to size. 

c) Substance - The bone is heavier than would be expected in a dog this size but not so massive as to prevent the speed and agility most desirable in a Samoyed. In all builds, the bone should be in proportion to body size. The Samoyed should never be so heavy as to appear clumsy nor so light as to appear racy.

COAT AND COLOUR: 
a) Coat - type and texture - The Samoyed is a double-coated dog. The body should be well covered with an undercoat of soft, short thick closed wool with longer, harsher hair growing through it to form the outer coat, which stands straight out from the body and should be free from curl in the adult dog. The coat should form a ruff around the neck and shoulders, framing the head (more on the males than on the females). Quality of coat should be weather resistant and considered more important than quantity. a droopy coat is undesirable. Length of coat is unimportant when compared to type of coat and texture. The coat should glisten with a silver sheen. The female does not usually carry as long a coat as most males and it may be slightly softer in texture. 

b) Colour - They must be white, white and biscuit, white cream, cream or all biscuit. All of these colours should be considered equal. Any other colours disqualify. 

c) Faults - Curly, wavy, flat, droopy, soft or silky outercoat is extremely undesirable. Excessive coat length should be viewed as an exaggeration of type and is a fault. Extremely short, smooth coats are not typical. Lack of undercoat (with seasonal consideration). Coat parting down back.

HEAD
a) Skull - The skull is wedge-shaped, broad, flat, not round or apple-headed, and should form an equilateral triangle on lines between the inner base of the ears and the centre point of the stop. The stop should not be too abrupt, nevertheless well defined. In profile the topline of the skull should parallel the topline of the muzzle. 

b) Muzzle - Muzzle of medium length and medium width, neither coarse nor snipy; should taper toward the nose and be in proportion to the size of the dog and width of skull. Length of muzzle should be slightly shorter than length of skull. The muzzle must have depth with a strong underjaw. Whiskers should not be removed. 

c) Nose - Black for preference, but brown, liver or snow-nose not penalized. Colour of nose sometimes changes with age and weather. 

d) Mouth - Lips should be black for preference and slightly curved up at the corners of the mouth, giving the "Samoyed Smile". Lip lines should not have the appearance of being coarse nor should the flews drop predominantly at the corners of the mouth. The teeth should be strong, well-set, and snugly overlapping in a scissor bite. Overshot or undershot should be penalized. 

e) Eyes - Should be placed well apart and deep-set; almond shaped rims set with lower lid slanting toward an imaginary point approximating the outer base of the ear. both eye rims and eye colour should be dark. Round or protruding eyes penalized. Blue eyes disqualify. 

f) Ears - Strong and thick, erect, triangular and slightly rounded at the tips; should not be large or pointed, nor should they be small and "bear-eared". Ears should conform to head size and the size of the dog. They should be mobile and well covered inside with hair; hair full and stand-off before the ears. Length of ear should be the same
measurement as the distance from the inner base of the ear to the outer corner of the eye.

NECK: Strong, well muscled, moderately long, well arched; carried proudly when standing, set on sloping shoulders to carry head with dignity when at attention. Neck should blend in to shoulders with graceful arch. When moving at a trot, the neck is extended so that the head is carried slightly forward.

FOREQUARTERS: 

a) Shoulder - Shoulders should be long and sloping, with the shoulder blade well laid back at an IDEAL angle of 45 degrees to the ground. In the correctly constructed and balanced front assembly, the forelimbs are placed well back on the ribcage, with the point of the sternum (breastbone) well ahead of the front of the shoulder joint (point of shoulder). The length of the shoulder blade is approximately 1/3 the height at the tip of the withers. 

b) Upper Arm - The upper arm (humerus) angles backwards from point of shoulder to elbow, ideally forming a 90 degree angle with the shoulder blade, and is never perpendicular to the ground. The measurement from tip of shoulder blade to point of shoulder should equal measurement from point of shoulder to elbow. 

c) Lower Arm (radius & ulna) - When standing and viewed from the front, the legs are moderately spaced, parallel and straight, with elbows close to the body and turned neither in nor out. The angle at the elbow joint should be approximately 135 degrees. Because of depth of chest, legs should be moderately long. Length of lower arm should be 1 to 2 inches longer than length of scapula. Length of leg from ground to elbow should be approximately 55% of the total height at the withers. 

d) Pasterns - should be strong, sturdy and flexible. The pastern slopes at approximately 15 degrees from the vertical, allowing for spring and agility, and should not be more than 1/3 the length of the shoulderblade. 

e) Feet - Large, long, flattish, a hare-foot, slightly spread but not splayed; toes arched, pads thick and tough, with protective growth of hair between the toes. In natural stance, feet may be turned very slightly out - but excessive turn-out, pigeon-toed, round or cat-footed or splayed are faults.

BODY
a) Topline - The withers forms the highest part of the back. The back should appear level to the loin, medium in length, very muscular, neither long nor short coupled. The ideal length of the Samoyed from tip of sternum (breastbone) to end of pelvis is 10% more than the height at the withers. 

b) Chest - Should be deep, with moderate spring of rib and flattened at the sides to allow proper movement of the shoulders and freedom for the front legs. Should not be barrel-chested. The deepest part of the chest should be near the 9th rib. Heart and lung room are secured more by body depth than width. 

c) Loin - The loin is strong and slightly arched. 

d) Croup - must be full, slightly sloping and must continue imperceptibly to the root of the tail. e) Abdomen - The abdomen should be well shaped and tightly muscled and with the rear of the thorax, should swing up in a pleasing curve (tuck-up).

HINDQUARTERS:
a) Hipbone - The pelvis is set at 30 degrees to the horizontal and the length of the pelvis is equal to the length of the shoulder blade measurement. 

b) Upper Thigh - The femur or thigh joins the pelvis at the hip socket, ideally forming a 90 degree angle. The measurement of the femur is equal to the length of the pelvis. Muscle attachments must be very powerful, broad and evenly distributed. 

c) Lower Thigh - The lower thigh, comprised of the tibia and fibula, is ideally set at 90 degrees to the femur or upper thigh and is approximately 1/3 longer than the pelvis. This length is very important to the gait. 

d) Hocks - Should be well developed, sharply defined and set at approximately 30% of hip height. The rear pasterns should be parallel, and perpendicular to the ground in natural stance and forms an angle of about 120 degrees with the lower thigh or fibula and tibia. 

e) Stifle Bend - Stifles are well bent, approximately 45 degrees to the ground. 

f) Feet - A hare-foot, same as the front feet, although may be slightly longer and narrower than the front. If present, rear dewclaws are to be removed.

TAIL: The tail should be moderately long with the tail bone terminating approximately at the hock when down. It should be profusely covered with long hair and carried forward over the back and draped to either side when alert but sometimes dropped when at rest. It should not be set high or low, and should be mobile and loose, not tight over the back. A very tight, immobile tail or a double hooked tail is a fault. A judge should see the tail over the back once when judging.

GAIT: The Samoyed's characteristic gait is smooth and seemingly effortless. They are quick and light on their feet and when on a loose lead at a moderately fast trot, exhibiting good reach in the forequarter and powerful drive in the hindquarters, allowing them to cover the most ground with the fewest number of steps, expending the least amount of energy to perform the job for which they were bred. Side gait is extremely important in assessing the desired reach and drive in the Samoyed. When viewed from the front or rear, when moving at a walk or slow trot, they will not single-track, but as speed increases, the legs gradually angle inward until the pads are falling on a line directly under the longitudinal centre of the body. As the pad marks converge, the forelegs and hindlegs are carried straight forward, with neither elbows nor stifles turned out. The back should remain strong, firm, and level, with very little lateral or vertical displacement. A choppy or stilted or restricted gait should be penalized.

FAULTS: The foregoing description is that of the ideal Samoyed. Any deviation from the above described dog must be penalized to the extent of the deviation. Since the Samoyed is a working breed any faults of soundness should be considered serious.

DISQUALIFICATIONS: Any colour other than white, biscuit, white and biscuit, white and cream, cream. B
lue eyes. 

American Samoyed Standard

General Conformation

(a) General Appearance
The Samoyed, being essentially a working dog, should present a picture of beauty, alertness and strength, with agility, dignity and grace. As his work lies in cold climates, his coat should be heavy and weather-resistant, well groomed, and of good quality rather then quantity. The male carries more of a "ruff" than the female. He should not be long in the back as a weak back would make him practically useless for his legitimate work, but at the same time, a close-coupled body would also place him at a great disadvantage as a draft dog. Breeders should aim for the happy medium, a body not long but muscular, allowing liberty, with a deep chest and well-sprung ribs, strong neck, straight front and especially strong loins. Males should be masculine in appearance and deportment without unwarranted aggressiveness; bitches feminine without weakness of structure or apparent softness of temperament. Bitches may be slightly longer in back than males. They should both give the appearance of being capable of great endurance but be free from coarseness. Because of the depth of chest required, the legs should be moderately long. A very short-legged dog is to be deprecated. Hindquarters should be particularly well developed, stifles well bent and any suggestion of unsound stifles or cowhocks severely penalized. General appearance should include movement and general conformation, indicating balance and good substance.

(b) Substance
Substance is that sufficiency of bone and muscle which rounds out a balance with the frame. The bone is heavier than would be expected in a dog of this size but not so massive as to prevent the speed and agility most desirable in a Samoyed. In all builds, bone should be in proportion to body size. The Samoyed should never be so heavy as to appear clumsy nor so light as to appear racy. The weight should be in proportion to the height.

(c) Height
Males--21 to 23 inches; females--19 to 21 inches at the withers. An oversized or undersized Samoyed is to be penalized according to the extent of the deviation.

(d) Coat (Texture & Condition)
The Samoyed is a doublecoated dog. The body should be well covered with an undercoat of soft, short, thick, close wool with longer and harsh hair growing through it to form the outer coat, which stands straight out from the body and should be free from curl. The coat should form a ruff around the neck and shoulders, framing the head (more on males than on females). Quality of coat should be weather resistant and considered more than quantity. A droopy coat is undesirable. The coat should glisten with a silver sheen. The female does not usually carry as long a coat as most males and it is softer in texture.

(e) Color
Samoyeds should be pure white, white and biscuit, cream, or all biscuit. Any other colors disqualify.

Movement

(a) Gait
The Samoyed should trot, not pace. He should move with a quick agile stride that is well timed. The gait should be free, balanced and vigorous, with good reach in the forequarters and good driving power in the hindquarters. When trotting, there should be a strong rear action drive. Moving at a slow walk or trot, they will not single-track, but as speed increases the legs gradually angle inward until the pads are finally falling on a line directly under the longitudinal center of the body. As the pad marks converge the forelegs and hind legs are carried straight forward in traveling, the stifles not turned in nor out. The back should remain strong, firm and level. A choppy or stilted gait should be penalized.

(b) Rear End
Upper thighs should be well developed. Stifles well bent-approximately 45 degrees to the ground. Hocks should be well developed, sharply defined and set at approximately 30 percent of hip height. The hind legs should be parallel when viewed from the rear in a natural stance, strong, well developed, turning neither in nor out. Straight stifles are objectionable. Double-jointedness or cowhocks are a fault. Cowhocks should only be determined if the dog has had an opportunity to move properly.

(c) Front End
Legs should be parallel and straight to the pasterns. The pasterns should be strong, sturdy and straight, but flexible with some spring for proper let-down of feet. Because of depth of chest, legs should be moderately long. Length of leg from the ground to the elbow should be approximately 55 per cent of the total height at the withers-a very short-legged dog is to be deprecated. Shoulders should be long and sloping, with a layback of 45 degrees and be firmly set. Out at the shoulders or out at the elbows should be penalized. The withers separation should be approximately 1-1 inches.

(d) Feet
Large, long, flattish-a hare-foot, slightly spread but not splayed; toes arched; pads thick and tough, with protective growth of hair between the toes. Feet should turn neither in nor out in a natural stance but may turn in slightly in the act of pulling. Turning out, pigeon-toed, round or cat-footed or splayed are faults. Feathers on feet are not too essential but are more profuse on females than on males

Head

(a) Conformation
Skull is wedge-shaped, broad, slightly crowned, not round or apple-headed, and should form an equilateral triangle on lines between the inner base of the ears and the central point of the stop. Muzzle--Muzzle of medium length and medium width, neither coarse nor snipy; should taper toward the nose and be in proportion to the size of the dog and the width of skull. The muzzle must have depth. Whiskers are not to be removed. Stop--Not too abrupt, nevertheless well defined. Lips--Should be black for preference and slightly curved up at the corners of the mouth, giving the "Samoyed smile." Lip lines should not have the appearance of being coarse nor should the flews drop predominately at corners of the mouth.

Ears
Strong and thick, erect, triangular and slightly rounded at the tips; should not be large or pointed, nor should they be small and "bear-eared." Ears should conform to head size and the size of the dog; they should be set well apart but be within the border of the outer edge of the head; they should be mobile and well covered inside with hair; hair full and stand-off before the ears. Length of ear should be the same measurement as the distance from inner base of ear to outer corner of eye.

Eyes
Should be dark for preference; should be placed well apart and deep-set; almond shaped with lower lid slanting toward an imaginary point approximately the base of ears. Dark eye rims for preference. Round or protruding eyes penalized. Blue eyes disqualifying.

Nose
Black for preference but brown, liver, or Dudley nose not penalized. Color of nose sometimes changes with age and weather.

Jaws and Teeth .
Strong, well-set teeth, snugly overlapping with scissors bite. Undershot or overshot should be penalized.

(b) Expression-The expression, referred to as "Samoyed expression," is very important and is indicated by sparkle of the eyes, animation and lighting up of the face when alert or intent on anything. Expression is made up of a combination of eyes, ears and mouth. The ears should be erect when alert; the mouth should be slightly curved up at the corners to form the "Samoyed smile."

Torso

(a) Neck
Strong, well muscled, carried proudly erect, set on sloping shoulders to carry head with dignity when at attention. Neck should blend into shoulders with a graceful arch.

(b) Chest
Should be deep, with ribs well sprung out from the spine and flattened at the sides to allow proper movement of the shoulders and freedom for the front legs. Should not be barrel-chested. Perfect depth of chest approximates the point of elbows, and the deepest part of the chest should be back of the forelegs-near the ninth rib. Heart and lung room are secured more by body depth than width.

(c) Loin and Back
The withers forms the highest part of the back. Loins strong and slightly arched. The back should be straight to the loin, medium in length, very muscular and neither long nor short-coupled. The dog should be "just off square"--the length being approximately 5 per cent more than the height. Females allowed to be slightly longer than males. The belly should be well shaped and tightly muscled and, with the rear of the thorax, should swing up in a pleasing curve (tuck-up). Croup must be full, slightly sloping, and must continue imperceptibly to the tail root.

Tail
The tail should be moderately long with the tail bone terminating approximately at the hock when down. It should be profusely covered with long hair and carried forward over the back or side when alert, but sometimes dropped when at rest. It should not be high or low set and should be mobile and loose -- not tight over the back. A double hook is a fault. A judge should see the tail over the back once when judging.

Disposition
Intelligent, gentle, loyal, adaptable, alert, full of action, eager to serve, friendly but conservative, not distrustful or shy, not overly aggressive. Unprovoked aggressiveness is to be severely penalized.

DISQUALIFICATION
Any color other than pure white, cream, biscuit, or white and biscuit.
Blue eyes.


Approved August 10, 1993
Effective September 29, 1993
 


United Kennel Club Samoyed Breed Standard

History

This member of the Spitz family takes its name from the Samoyed people, a nomadic tribe whose survival in the harsh Siberian tundra depended on their hardy white dogs. Samoyed dogs were used to hunt, herd reindeer, and haul sledges. Living in close proximity to their owners, the Samoyed dogs were noted for their gentle good nature. Polar explorers discovered this versatile breed and began importing them to England just prior to and during World War I. English aristocracy adopted the friendly white Samoyed with enthusiasm and, in turn, introduced the breed to the United States.

The Samoyed was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1927.  

General Appearance

The Samoyed is a medium-sized Spitz-type dog with a wedge-shaped head, prick ears, and a profuse white or biscuit-colored double coat. The corners of the mouth are turned up slightly, giving the impression that the dog is smiling. The body is slightly longer than tall, and legs are somewhat long and moderately well boned. The tail is moderately long, covered with long hair, and normally carried over the back, draped to one side or the other. Gender differences in this breed are very apparent. Typically, males carry a heavier "ruff" on the neck, while females may be slightly longer in body. The Samoyed is a working dog, capable of a variety of tasks. Deviations from the standard are to be penalized to the degree they affect the dog's versatility and agility.  

Characteristics

The Samoyed is affectionate, gentle, intelligent and adaptable. They are trusting and eager to please. They are extremely sociable and live very easily with children and other dogs. Samoyeds require lots of interaction with their owners. They are lively and mischievous, even into old age. The Samoyed's characteristic good nature, combined with his white color and "smiling" appearance, has contributed to the steady popularity of this breed. 

Head

The head is proportional to the size of the body. From the front, the head forms a medium-length wedge. Viewed from above, the broad skull tapers very distinctly toward the place where the muzzle joins it and then tapers slightly from the base of the muzzle toward the nose. The skull and muzzle are roughly parallel to one another when viewed from the side, and joined by a well-defined, but not abrupt, stop.

The Samoyed has a characteristic expression that is an essential element of breed type. It is made up of the correct combination of eye color and placement, ear shape and erect carriage, and the upturned corners of the tight, dark lips.

SKULL -- The skull is broad, wedge-shaped, and slightly domed. Lines drawn between the inner corners of the ears and the central point of the stop form an equilateral triangle.

Faults: Round or apple head.

MUZZLE -- The muzzle is proportionate to the size of the dog and the width of the skull. The muzzle is deep and of moderate length and width. Viewed from the front, the muzzle is well filled in under the eyes, and there is slight tapering toward the nose. Lips are preferably black and tightly closed, with a slight curve upward at the corners of the mouth. This "Samoyed smile" is an essential characteristic of the breed. Whiskers are not trimmed.

Faults: Coarse, snipey, or shallow muzzle; thick or pendulous lips.

TEETH -- The Samoyed has a complete set of evenly spaced, white teeth with a scissors bite.

Faults: Undershot or overshot.

NOSE -- Black is preferred, but a brown, liver, or Dudley nose is acceptable. Changes in nose color due to age or weather are not penalized.

EYES -- Shape of the eyes is very important to establish correct Samoyed expression. The eyes are dark brown, almond-shaped, and set obliquely and wide apart. Eye rims are tight and darkly pigmented.

Faults: Round or protruding eyes.

Disqualification: Blue eyes.

EARS -- Ears are proportionate to the size of the head and are carried strongly erect. They are triangular in shape, slightly rounded at the tips, and set well apart, but not extending beyond a line drawn upward from the outer edge of the skull. The length of the ear from base to tip is equal to the length of a line drawn from the inner base of the ear to the outer corner of the eye. Ears are highly mobile and expressive. Hair covers the inside and outside of the ears. The hair in front of the ears is full and stands away from the head.

Faults: Ears too large or too small; "bear-like" ears; pointed ears.

Neck

 The neck is moderately long, but strong and well muscled, blending into sloping shoulders with a graceful arch. The neck is free of throatiness and covered with a thick ruff of hair. 

Forequarters

The shoulders are long and well laid back, with good angulation and well-developed muscles. The shoulder blade and the upper arm are roughly equal in length. The upper arm lies close to the ribs with the elbow moving close to the body. The forelegs are moderately well boned, straight and muscular, with moderately short, moderately sloping, flexible pasterns. The length of leg from elbow to ground should be approximately 55 percent of the dog's height at the withers. The space between the tips of the shoulder blades is approximately 1 to 1 inches.

Faults: Very short legs; out at shoulders or elbows; straight or broken-down pasterns.  

Body

The Samoyed is about five percent longer, measured from prosternum to point of buttocks, than tall, measured from the withers to the ground. Females may be slightly longer. The withers are the highest points of the backline and blend gracefully into the level back. The loin is very muscular, slightly arched, and of sufficient length to allow for easy movement and powerful drive from the rear. The belly is tight, with moderate tuck-up. The croup is full and slightly sloping.

The ribs are well sprung from the spine and then flatten to allow free movement of the front legs. The first four ribs are somewhat flatter at the top than the rest of the rib cage, to allow free movement of the shoulder blade. The body is deep, extending at least to the elbows, with the deepest part just behind the forelegs.

Faults: Barrel chest; body too long or too short-coupled.

Hindquarters 

The thighs are strong and muscular. The rear legs are well angulated at stifle and hock joints. The hocks are well let down. Viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns should be parallel to each other; from the side, they should be perpendicular to the ground.

Faults: Straight stifles; cowhocks; double-jointedness.  

Feet

Feet are large, long, and somewhat flat. Toes are arched and slightly spread but not splayed. Pads are thick and tough with a protective growth of hair between the toes. Feathering on feet may be more profuse on females than males.

Faults: Toeing in or out; round or cat foot; splayed feet.

Tail 

The tail is set neither high nor low, and of moderate length, reaching about to the hock when straightened out. When the dog is alert or moving, the tail is carried forward over the back or draped to the side, but loosely and without any loss of mobility. When the dog is relaxed, the tail may hang down between the legs. The tail is covered with profuse feathering. When judging the Samoyed, the judge must see the tail over the back at least once.

Faults: Double hook tail; tail snapped tightly to the back; tail set too high or too low.  

Coat

The profuse, dense, double coat of the Samoyed was essential to this breed's ability to live and work in the harshest arctic environment. The outer coat is long, straight and coarse, standing away from the body, while the undercoat is short, dense, and soft. The hair on the neck and shoulders forms a protective ruff. Males generally carry longer, harsher coats than females and a more profuse ruff.

A coat of the correct weather-resistant texture glistens with a silver sheen. The weather-resistant quality of the coat is more important than quantity of coat when evaluating this breed. Hair on the skull and the front parts of the legs is shorter than the body coat. Hair on the brisket, backs of thighs, and tail is longer.

Fault: Droopy coat.

Colour 

Pure white, white and biscuit, cream, or all biscuit.

Disqualification: Any color other than those listed.  

Height and Weight

Desirable height for a mature male Samoyed is 21 to 23 inches. Desirable height for a mature female Samoyed is 19 to 21 inches. Deviation from the desirable heights should be penalized to the extent of the deviation.

The bone of a Samoyed is heavier than might be expected in a dog of this size but is not so massive as to reduce the dog's speed or agility. The Samoyed should never be so heavy as to appear clumsy or so light as to appear racy. Weight should be in proportion to height and in accordance with these principles.

Gait 

When trotting, the gait is effortless, smooth, powerful and well coordinated, showing good reach in front and drive behind. The backline remains level with only a slight flexing to indicate suppleness. Viewed from any position, legs turn neither in nor out, nor do feet cross or interfere with each other. As speed increases, feet tend to converge toward centerline of balance.

Poor movement should be penalized to the degree to which it reduces the Samoyed's ability to perform the tasks it was bred to do.

Faults: Choppy or stilted gait; pacing.

Disqualifications

Unilateral or bilateral cryptorchid. Viciousness or extreme shyness. Any color other than pure white, cream, biscuit, or white and biscuit. Albinism. Blue eyes.

 

FCI  International Samoyed Standard

Pre 1987 Kennel Club, London

GENERAL APPEARANCE - The Samoyed being essentially a working dog should be strong and active and graceful, and as his work lies in cold climates his coat should be heavy and weather-resisting. He should not be too long in back, as a weak back would make him practically useless for his legitimate work; but at the same time a cobby body, such as a Chow's would also place him at a great disadvantage as a draught dog. Breeders should aim for the happy medium, viz. a body not long, but muscular, allowing liberty, with a deep chest and well sprung ribs, strong neck proudly arched, straight front and exceptionally strong loins. Both dogs and bitches should give the appearance of being capable of great endurance but should be free from coarseness. A full grown dog should stand about 53.5 cm (21 ins.) at the shoulder. On account of the depth of chest required the legs should be moderately long, a very short-legged dog is to be deprecated. Hindquarters should be particularly well developed, stifles well angulated, and any suggestion of unsound stifles or cowhocks severely penalised.

CHARACTERISTICS - The Samoyed is intelligent, alert, full of action but above all displaying affection towards all mankind.

TEMPERAMENT - (See under Characteristics.)

HEAD AND SKULL - Head powerful and wedge-shaped with a broad, flat skull, muzzle of medium length, a tapering foreface not too sharply defined. Lips black. Hair short and smooth before the ears. Nose black for preference, but may be brown or flesh-coloured. Strong jaws.

EYES - Almond shaped, medium to dark brown in colour, set well apart with alert and intelligent expression. Eyerims should be black and unbroken.

EARS - Thick, not too long and slightly rounded at the tips, set well apart and well covered inside with hair. The ears should be fully erect in the grown dog.

MOUTH - Upper teeth should just overlap the underteeth in a scissor bite.

NECK - Proudly arched.

FOREQUARTERS - Legs straight and muscular with good bone.

BODY - Back medium in length, broad and very muscular. Chest broad and deep ribs well sprung, giving plenty of heart and lung room.

HINDQUARTERS - Very muscular, stifles well angulated; cow hocks or straight stifles very objectionable.

FEET - Long, flattish and slightly spread out. Soles well cushioned with hair.

TAIL - Long and profuse, carried over the back when alert; sometimes dropped when at rest.

GAIT/MOVEMENT - Should move freely with a strong agile drive showing power and elegance.

COAT - The body should be well covered with a thick, close, soft and short undercoat, with harsh hair growing through it, forming the outer coat, which should stand straight away from the body and be free from curl.

COLOUR - Pure white; white and biscuit; cream.

SIZE - Dogs 51-56 cm (20-22 ins) at the shoulder.
Bitches: 46-51 cm (18-20 ins) at the shoulder.
Weight in proportion to size.

FAULTS - Severe unprovoked aggressiveness.
Long foreface.
Blue or very light eyes.
Big ears with very little feathering.
Drop ears; narrow width between ears.
A bull neck. A long body.
Slack tail carriage; it should be carried well over the back, though it may drop when the dog is at rest.
Round, cat-like feet.
A soft coat; a wavy coat; absence of undercoat.
Absence of Feathering.
Black or black spots.
Any sign of unsound movement.

NOTE - Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

 

 

 

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